Opportunity Zones and Inclusive Community Development: New Money + Meaning Podcast Recorded Live in Baltimore

For any community development initiative to achieve the desired positive outcomes, impact investors must design with communities instead of for them. Opportunity Zones, even with the recent criticism, are still seen as a way to drive investments that will build wealth and create social impact in marginalized communities. How can the great community development work that is being done at the local level be connected with big top-down policies like Opportunity Zones? This episode, recorded live in Baltimore, features a cross-sector panel of community leaders, investors, and OZ experts exploring inclusive community development.

How Cooperatives Build Community Wealth on Money + Meaning: Recorded Live at SOCAP 365 Baltimore

Cooperatives hold incredible promise to build wealth in marginalized communities and reduce the racial wealth gap but myths and misconceptions about alternative ownership models are common. Many lenders and investors are skeptical of cooperatively-owned businesses or find them too “risky” to qualify for investment. This episode, recorded live at a SOCAP 365 event in Baltimore, is a panel discussion about the promise of the cooperative model to create social and economic change, including frank observations about the challenges that often prevent these businesses from securing investment or achieving success at scale.

Closing the Racial Wealth Gap: SOCAP’s Money + Meaning Podcast Episode 2.7

On this week’s episode of Money + Meaning, recorded live at the SOCAP 365 PNW event in Seattle, you’ll hear Sayer Jones, Director of Mission Related Investing for Meyer Memorial Trust, Lisa Yancey, Co-Founder of The We’s Match, and Stephen Green, Founder of PitchBlack, in a candid and realistic conversation about what it will take to close the racial wealth gap.

User Data, Trust, and Transparency: SOCAP Podcast Money + Meaning Episode 2.4

As user data collection has evolved from web data to mobile to ubiquitous environmental sensing, important questions are being raised about data usage, consumer privacy, and corporate transparency. Topics discussed include: Who owns the vast amounts of personal data that are being collected today? Is privacy becoming something that only the rich can afford? Has user behavior created an economic incentive for companies to care about data and privacy breaches? How are governments attempting to regulate “big data”? This discussion features Erika Karp, the founder and CEO of Cornerstone Capital, an impact investing firm, Sonia Katyal, the Chancellor’s Professor of Law at UC Berkeley and the Co-Director of the Berkeley Center for Law & Technology, and Timothy Morey, the VP of Strategy for frog design, a global design and strategy consulting firm.